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another A r c h i p e l a g o

Archipelago Volume 10, Numbers 3-4fiction

Frank McGuinness : Andy Warhol Says A Mass

poetry

Kevin McFadden : Anticism!

fiction

Isabel Fargo Cole and Hermann Ungar : Two Stories

Ungar tr. from the German by Isabel Fargo Cole

autobiography

Beatrix Ost : My Father’s House

tr. from the German by Jonathan McVity with the Author

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A R C H I P E L A G O


Issue One

“Archipelago: def. 1 “Any sea or sheet of water, studded with many isles.” We live, though this is easily forgotten, on an island group of exceptional intricacy. Together, the territories conventionally called England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales comprise over 5,500 islands, studding and separating the Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea. And between them, the languages of this archipelago muster dozens of words for “island”, depending on size, profile, and water-context (fresh or salt; running or still; marine, estuarine or riverine). Listed, these words form a poem of paraphones: skerrie, skellig, sgeir, eyot, eilean, islet, inis, ynys, inch, isle, ailsa, ellan, oilean.”
Image

ImageAnnouncing the forthcoming publication of ARCHIPELAGO Issue One, available Summer 2007

ARCHIPELAGO is to be a literary magazine in the ordinary sense, in that it will contain writings in non-fictional prose, and verse. Extraordinary will be its preoccupations with landscape, with documentary and remembrance, with wilderness and wet, with natural and cultural histories, with language and languages, with the littoral and vestigial, the geological, and topographical, with climates, in terms of both meteorology, ecology and environment; and all these things as metaphor, liminal and subliminal, at the margins, in the unnameable constellation of islands on the Eastern Atlantic coast, known variously in other millennia as Britain, Great Britain, Britain and Ireland etc; even, too, too readily, the United Kingdom (including the North of partitioned Ireland), though no such thing ever existed, other than in extremis during wartime, but in the letter. But while the unnameable archipelago is its subject, its vision is by implication global, and its concerns with the state of the planet could not be more of the hour.

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A R C H I P E L A G O

 

Issue One

“Archipelago: def. 1 “Any sea or sheet of water, studded with many isles.” We live, though this is easily forgotten, on an island group of exceptional intricacy. Together, the territories conventionally called England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales comprise over 5,500 islands, studding and separating the Atlantic Ocean and the North Sea. And between them, the languages of this archipelago muster dozens of words for “island”, depending on size, profile, and water-context (fresh or salt; running or still; marine, estuarine or riverine). Listed, these words form a poem of paraphones: skerrie, skellig, sgeir, eyot, eilean, islet, inis, ynys, inch, isle, ailsa, ellan, oilean.”
Image
 

ImageAnnouncing the forthcoming publication of ARCHIPELAGO Issue One, available Summer 2007

ARCHIPELAGO is to be a literary magazine in the ordinary sense, in that it will contain writings in non-fictional prose, and verse. Extraordinary will be its preoccupations with landscape, with documentary and remembrance, with wilderness and wet, with natural and cultural histories, with language and languages, with the littoral and vestigial, the geological, and topographical, with climates, in terms of both meteorology, ecology and environment; and all these things as metaphor, liminal and subliminal, at the margins, in the unnameable constellation of islands on the Eastern Atlantic coast, known variously in other millennia as Britain, Great Britain, Britain and Ireland etc; even, too, too readily, the United Kingdom (including the North of partitioned Ireland), though no such thing ever existed, other than in extremis during wartime, but in the letter. But while the unnameable archipelago is its subject, its vision is by implication global, and its concerns with the state of the planet could not be more of the hour.

The first issue features contributions by: Paul Abbott, Norman Ackroyd, John Beatty, Julian Bell, Roger Deakin, Greg Delanty, Seamus Heaney, Mick Imlah, Nicolas Jacobs, Andrew Kahn, Michael Longley, Robert Macfarlane, Derek Mahon, Osip Mandelshtam, Andrew McNeillie, Gail McNeillie, David Nash, Bernard O’Donoghue, Angharad Price and Mark Williams. For notes on contributors click here.

The first issue of ARCHIPELAGO was successfully launched as part of the Passionate Natures conference held at Emmanuel College, Cambridge, 22-24 June 2007.

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Integral 4 Dummies: ‘The Integral Vision’ by Ken Wilber

 

 

Pages 10-11 The Integral Vision

A Very Short Introduction to the Revolutionary Integral Approach to Life, God, the Universe, and Everything

By Ken Wilber

Ken Wilber / Philosophy

Paperback original / Shambhala Publications / 232 pages / 5 1/2 x 7

ISBN 978-1-59030-475-4 / August 2007

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Integral 4 Dummies: ‘The Integral Vision’ by Ken Wilber

Reviews of The Integral Vision

“Philosopher, psychologist, and mystic Wilber delivers on the subtitle’s far-reaching promise. . . . Chock full of handsome illustrations and spare, Zen-like diagrams and tables, Wilber’s work here is still accessible and at times surprisingly practical. Some language spirals up majestically, recalling great Eastern texts. Reminiscent in spirit and watershed import of Ram Dass’s Be Here Now, Wilber may well have created a popular classic for explorers on the frontiers of humanity.”—Publishers Weekly

 

 

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Buddhist Geeks

Buddhist Geeks

https://i1.wp.com/www.buddhistgeeks.com/images/iTunes_Podcast2.jpg“…and if you’re wondering whether or not you’re a Buddhist Geek (”Geek” here does not refer to computer geeks. We use geek to describe someone who is passionate about andhttps://i2.wp.com/www.buddhistgeeks.com/images/thegeeks_small.jpg dedicated to some particular activity), we would say that the safest way to find out would be to look at your bookshelf and/or your friends. Oddly, they tend to reveal a lot! For us, a Buddhist Geek is someone who is intimately involved with Buddhist theory and practice, and who has a certain connection to the Buddhist tradition.Stepping back for a moment, we’re also hoping to stimulate and be stimulated by the emerging Buddhoblogosphere, and in the spirit of Freedom of which the Buddha so clearly taught, our greatest desire is that this material be of direct benefit to the continued awakening of all seekers of the way.”

 

 

(Chapeau Mu)

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Zen and the Art of Poetics

The image “https://i0.wp.com/www.parallax.org/books/callmebysc/front.jpg” cannot be displayed, because it contains errors.Zen and the Art of Poetics

…a language that helps you to remove concepts

Talking about poetry, different modalities and Keat’s Negative Capabilities; Thich Nhat Hanh talks about the limitations of language, and the use of a different language in Zen. He talks of a language that is not made of concepts, a language that helps you to remove concepts.

Words cannot express things;
Speech does not convey the spirit.
Swayed by words, one is lost;
Blocked by phrases, one is bewildered.

Two Zen Classics: Mumonkan & Hekiganroku, p. 110
Translated with commentaries by Katsuki Sekida

He goes on to say that that from time to time he uses such language himself, and he relates that famous example of when he was in Philadelphia in 1968, at the height of the Vietnam War, the only Buddhist monk at an anti-war demo. A reporter asked him if he was the North or South of Vietnam, so if he says the North, he is anti-American, if he says the South he is with the Liberation Front aligned with the North, or he is betraying the cause of anti-communism. These were the two boxes he was given to ‘check’ as he puts it, tick.

As he steps masterfully between the horns of the dilemma he announces;
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